Glendale Community College

Glendale Community College

Address

https://www.glendale.edu/

1500 North Verdugo Road

Glendale

91208

Courses

Independent Media Production ( Media 290 )

Designed to provide a realistic working experience in film and media production. The emphasis is on individual production of short films and media segments in order to build a personal portfolio or demo reel of production work. Students have regular access to professional film and media equipment and gain experience with all capabilities of the Media Arts studio. Students may also create independent media productions for the campus and community.

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day

Writing for Media ( Media 120 )

An introduction to writing for film, television, radio and electronic media. The course focuses on preparing scripts in proper formats, including fundamental technical, conceptual and stylistic issues related to writing fiction and non-fiction scripts for informational and entertainment purposes in film and electronic media. The course includes a writing evaluation component as a significant part of the course requirement.

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day

Motion Picture Editing ( Media 112 )

An intermediate-level media production class. Emphasis is on editing techniques and aesthetics for motion picture productions using professional applications. Topics include system set-up, footage importing, append and insert editing, dialog and multi-clip editing, media management, pace, continuity, format workflow, effects, titling and compression. Students output their projects to professional-level deliverable digital video files.

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day

Aesthetics of Cinema ( Media 110 )

MEDIA 110 is the study of the aesthetics and creation of cinematic art. Emphasis is placed on aesthetic concepts as well as the techniques and practices employed to achieve the aesthetic goals of the filmmaker. Specific topics include narrative, visual design, cinematography, editing, sound design, genre, and authorship. The course surveys a wide variety of films, filmmakers, and film movements to explore the diverse possibilities presented by the cinematic art form. Lectures, discussions and readings are supplemented by the screening of representative films

   

Introduction to Audio Production ( Media 107 )

Teaches students the basic principles, aesthetics, and techniques required in the production of audio programs and soundtracks for video programs. Specific topics include digital recording and editing, selection and use of microphones, sound studio operation, multi-tracking, equalization, compression, mixing, editing, and synchronization with video. Industry standard software such as Pro Tools will be utilized. Hands-on practice with professional equipment is emphasized

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day

Introduction To Motion Picture Production ( Media 103 )

MEDIA 103 provides students with a basic overview of the aesthetics and techniques required in single-camera motion picture production. Topics include basic cinematography, camera familiarization and operation, lenses, camera angles, camera blocking and movement, coverage, continuity, digital recording formats, filters, location production, lighting and simple editing. Projects consist of hands-on experiences with digital cinema cameras and editing workstations.

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day

Drawing For Animation ( Art 201 )

ART 201 introduces students to drawing for animation. Learning to draw from the imagination is a primary goal of this course. Students learn to analyze and construct the human fi gure and animals as well as to create environments for animated characters. Topics discussed include gesture and attitude drawing, structure, weight, anatomy, and perspective. Drapery and lighting are also be discussed.

   

Introduction To Character Design ( Art 209 )

ART 209 introduces students to character design for animation. Students explore and develop traits of particular characters and particular archetypes. Students draw from life as well as from the imagination. Topics to be discussed include shape, silhouette, color, caricature, underlying structure, and costume. Students will be expected to keep a sketchbook and to create model sheets for their own personal designs.

   

Introduction To Motion Graphics ( Art 220 )

ART 220 provides students with introductory instruction in motion graphics, compositing, visual effects, and animation techniques using Adobe After Effects. Students learn to use digitally scanned photography or artwork, vector based content, video, and audio to create animated sequences. Fundamental aesthetic concepts in creating motion graphics are covered, including composition, color, motion, and timing. Students are exposed to basic technical concepts, such as aspect ratio, output type, and compression/decompression.

   

Advanced Motion Graphics ( Art 221 )

ART 221 provides students with advanced instruction in motion graphics and compositing techniques using Adobe After Effects. Students learn to create broadcast-quality motion graphic animations. Building on the skills learned in ART 220, students are required in this course to realize their designs with a high degree of fidelity to their original design concepts.

   

Character Set-Up/Kinematics ( Art 233 )

ART 233 provides students with training in character set-up techniques. The course begins with a thorough review of the animation and character set-up toolset. Skills taught include installation of the skeleton within wireframe mesh, establishment of animation controls such as inverse kinematic (IK) handles and set-driven-key relationships, and binding of mesh to skeleton using rigid and smooth models. Note: Current industry standard digital animation software (Maya) will be used.

   

Advanced 3D Character Set-Up ( Art 234 )

ART 234 provides students with advanced training in character set-up techniques. Skills covered include binding of the character using joints and influence objects, installation and modification of the Full-Body Inverse kinematic (FBIK) skeleton, the creation of blendshape targets, and the facial animation control system. The student will be encouraged to design a character set-up and test it for use in an animated scene. Note: Current industry standard digital animation software will be used.

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day Evening

Digital Sculpture I ( Art 245 )

ART 245 provides students with foundation instruction in digital character sculpture, enabling students to create a basic polygonal mesh in Maya, import this mesh into a digital sculpture software application, and then use the software to add sculptural and textural detail to it. The entire toolset of the digital sculpture software is covered, in addition to practical concerns involved in integrating digital sculptural content into movies or games. Note: Current industry standard digital animation software (ZBrush or Mudbox) will be used

   

Digital Sculpture II ( Art 246 )

ART 246 provides students with advanced instruction in digital character sculpture, building on skills acquired in Art 245. At the end of the course, students will sculpt and texture a highly realistic digital character. The course is project-based and runs as a traditional art studio course, with the instructor guiding students through the stages of character creation. Note: Current industry standard digital animation software will be used.

Delivery Mode:  On Campus     Delivery Time:  Day

Introduction to TV Studio Production ( Media 101 )

Provides students with a basic overview of the aesthetics and techniques required in the production of studio based multiple camera video programs. The topics include studio and control room operations, directing, crew responsibilities, operation of video and audio equipment, lighting, video graphics and sound mixing. Projects consist of hands-on experiences in several video studio production situations performed in the Glendale College Television Studio (GCTV Studio.)

   

Instructors

Ben Bardens - Brian Hatfield - Allan Jacobsen - Mike Jones - Marty Mullin - Marisol Gomez - Geri Ulrey - Carley Steiner - Roger Dickes
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